Archive for November, 2012

1929 Ford Model A Roadster – Build Update

Sunday, November 25th, 2012

 

 

1929 Ford Model A Roadster – Build Update

 

With a month to Christmas, the time working on the 1929 Ford roadster hot rod will be slim.  Santa’s workshop will swing into gear and this big elf will start making few gifts this year.  I haven’t done for a number of years.  Storing the Corvette off site this winter has opened up the shop with a bit of well needed elbow space making a few other projects possible.  It’s all these distractions that make time for building a hot rod difficult and time consuming. 

  1929 Ford roadster hot rod - build update picture 1

To take a break from illustrating the build of the hot rod, I decided to post several pictures of the 1929 Ford roadster as it is today.  This will give readers an idea of the direction I am heading with the build of this hot rod.  So, today I decided to wheel the hot rod out of the shop, and snap a few pictures and shoot a bit of video out in the lane.  While the hot rod was outside I also thought it would be a good idea to wash off some of the shop dust and dirt that has accumulated while in the shop.

   1929 Ford roadster hot rod - build update picture 2

  1929 Ford roadster hot rod - build update picture 3

Looking at the hot rod outside, I noticed a few things that should be changed.  Everything looks much different from a distance outside.  Of course a wheel alignment is obvious in the front end.  The Mercedes Benz horn I mounted on the front cross member needs to be hidden away.  The front Jaguar coil over shocks will be replaced with either aluminum or chrome ones and the list goes on.  Hmmmmmmm.

   1929 Ford roadster hot rod - build update picture 4

  1929 Ford roadster hot rod - build update picture 5

I must say that building a hot rod pretty much from scratch is not as easy as it sounds.  There is so much detail to consider in the hot rod and it’s all packed in a relatively small and very confined space.  Building the hot rod is very enjoyable and extremely therapeutic.  What a great way to forget the problems of the day.  It’s the biggest puzzle I have worked on so far.  With the hot rod about 85% complete, the last 15% is taking 85% of the time.  The devil is in the details!  I intend to mold from fiber glass the trunk floor, and center console for the gear shifter and a few switches.  The exhaust still needs to be welded, brakes juiced up, and an emergency brake installed.  Then there is the interior, sound system, and the final paint.  Oh my, oh my!! 

   1929 Ford roadster hot rod - build update picture 6

After Christmas I will give it my best to get the 1929 Ford roadster hot rot road worthy for the upcoming season.  At this point, an interior and paint job might need to wait till next winter.  I really would like to test the hot rod out for a summer and see how it handles with the C4 Corvette suspension.  In the off chance modifications are required, it would be nice to do them before the final paint.  Let’s see what the New Year will have in store for me.

 

 

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DIY Gas Pedal for the 1929 Ford Model A Roadster

Monday, November 19th, 2012

 

DIY Gas Pedal for the 1929 Ford Model A Roadster

 

Here we are in the middle of November with the sights and sounds of Christmas in full steam.   While out in the shop last night working on the 1929 Ford roadster hot rod, there was lots of Christmas music on the local classic rock radio station.  This created a nice atmosphere for working on the hot rod for several hours before a late Saturday night supper and movie with my wife.

 

Today I have a simple project for the hot rod, a simple and cheap gas pedal.  Several years ago when I dismantled the 1986 Corvette Indy Pace car convertible, I kept as many parts as I could use for the build of the hot rod.  Everything else was sold either locally, or on eBay, with many parts heading off to all corners of the earth and a great cash reward at the end of it all.  The gas pedal assembly from the 1986 Corvette seemed like a logical item to save. 

1929 Ford roadster gas pedal - picture 1

1929 Ford roadster gas pedal - picture 2

To connect the gas pedal to the carburetor, ¼” (inch) tie rod ends were used on each end of a ¼” (inch) aluminum rod.  The tie rod ends were the only items I purchased for this project.  To determine the location of the hole through the firewall for the throttle rod I attached it to the carburetor.  Then I positioned the throttle rod parallel to the engine both vertically and horizontally.  Once satisfied of the position, I scribed a center mark on the firewall.  Remember, measure twice and cut once.       

1929 Ford roadster gas pedal - picture 3

1929 Ford roadster gas pedal - picture 4  

Using a ½” (inch) stainless steel bolt and nut, a simple throttle rod bushing for the firewall was made on the metal lathe.  I rounded the bolt head and drilled an oversized hole through the bolt for the¼” (inch) throttle rod to pass through.  The rounded bolt head was mildly polished starting with course grit sandpaper ending up with 600 grit sand paper while in the lathe.  Since I am using very solid motor mounts on the engine I am able to use this method of the connecting the gas pedal to the carburetor instead of a cable.  The motor mounts I fabricated some time ago are 2” (inch) diameter by 1” thick urethane rubber mounts between the engine and the chassis.  This method of mounting the engine to the chassis will prevent much engine twist during acceleration.  This is an important consideration when using a solid throttle rod connection the gas pedal to the carburetor.

1929 Ford roadster gas pedal - picture 5

1929 Ford roadster gas pedal - picture 6  

Now that I know exactly where the throttle rod will enter into the cockpit, the exact mounting location for the Corvette gas pedal assembly can be determined.  For the gas pedal to work in the 1929 Ford roadster hot rod, the mounting bracket needed to be modified, and the upper arm was shortened slightly.  After a simple test fitting of the modified Corvette gas pedal on the hot rod, I quickly realized that the Corvette pedal pad was not a good fit for the hot rod.  Using a scrap piece of ¼” (inch) steel plate and fabricated a spoon shaped pedal pad and adapted it to the Corvette pedal assembly.  I was even able to adapt the small spring on the pedal pad.  This small spring maintains a good pedal pad position when not in use.  Later on, both the brake and gas pedal pads with be faced with aluminum or even replaced with an aluminum one.  Another option might even be to use stainless steel for both the brake and gas pedal pads.  These will be the finer details of the hot rod build that can be worked out once the car is on the road.

1929 Ford roadster gas pedal - picture 7

1929 Ford roadster gas pedal - picture 8  

As it would happen, the mild modifications to the Corvette gas pedal assembly provided a perfect fit for the 1929 Ford roadster hot rod.  Of course when I completed the modifications to the gas pedal, I did not have any machine shop equipment.  If I were to do the job today, I would have fabricated one entirely from scratch.  If I am going to complete the hot rod and enjoy driving it, I must look forward and not rebuild things because I have more shop equipment.  Otherwise, the build will never get completed.  The plan now is to have the 1929 Ford roadster hot rod on the road next summer.  With the build about 85% complete, the last 15% is taking most of the time.

 

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