Archive for the ‘The 1929 Ford Roadster Body’ Category

The 1929 Ford Roadster Body

Wednesday, January 20th, 2010

The 1929 Ford Roadster Body

Part of this car hobby is coming across all kinds of deals.  The fellow that sold me the 1931 Ford, and 350 engine/transmission, happened to know somebody that had a Brookville Roadster body stored in a barn not far from my home.  We managed to contact this gentleman and we arranged a time to check it out.  To my surprise, the fellow that owned the barn where the Brookville Roadster body was stored was a local antique dealer that I had known for a few years. When we arrived at the barn, only 5 minutes from my place, we found the 1928-29 Brookville Roadster body sitting on a pair of saw horses.  Both doors and the trunk lid were missing.  The body was sitting there with no primer or paint on it.  Apparently the fellow bought it several years ago.  He knew a local fellow in our area that would work on it for him.  As time passed, so do the fellow that was working on the car.  Over time, items started to go missing.  The doors, trunk lid, the 32 dash insert, windshield, and all kinds of other parts.  All that was left was a stripped down shell.    The original plan was to buy the body and re-sell it, and split the profits with my friend.  At the time I was not really interested in the car for myself.  I felt the car was small for me since I am 6’-4” tall and I would not have the leg room.   My friend who found out about this body tried over time to make a deal, but it didn’t happen.

1934 Plymouth 4 door car - original condition - view #1

1934 Plymouth 4 door car - original condition - view #1

1934 Plymouth 4 door car - original condition - view #2 - A neat car but in very rough condition

1934 Plymouth 4 door car - original condition - view #2 - A neat car but in very rough condition


As time passed, another friend in the car club knew somebody else that was selling a 1934 Plymouth 4 door car and asked if I was interested.  As always, I couldn’t resist, and took a look at the car.   To make a long story short, I bought the car for $500.  Now I had to figure out how to get the car home.  This was a pretty good deal considering the poor shape of the car.  The inside of the car was loaded with boxes spare parts.  Already having experience selling parts from the 1930 Plymouth, I knew very quickly this car would be a money maker for me.

1934 Plymouth 4 door car - original condition - view #3 - I only purchased this car to strip out a few parts to sell and then re-sell the car.

1934 Plymouth 4 door car - original condition - view #3 - I only purchased this car to strip out a few parts to sell and then re-sell the car.

1934 Plymouth 4 door car - original condition - view #4 - The interior view of this car. Lots of work for somebody, not me.

1934 Plymouth 4 door car - original condition - view #4 - The interior view of this car. Lots of work for somebody, not me.

It was easy to load the shell of the Brookville Roadster body onto my trailer and get it home the following day.  Once at home, I made a bit of a make shift seat, and sat in the car.  Visualizing the seating arrangements, leg positions, I was able to figure out a way to make this car work for me.  I now decided this would be something to keep. 

1934 Plymouth 4 door car - original condition - view #5 - This car came with a set of 5 of these wire wheels and a brand new tire.

1934 Plymouth 4 door car - original condition - view #5 - This car came with a set of 5 of these wire wheels and a brand new tire.

1934 Plymouth 4 door car - original condition - view #6 - What I found most interesting about this car was the independant front suspension.  I thought this was pretty advanced for the time period of the car.

1934 Plymouth 4 door car - original condition - view #6 - What I found most interesting about this car was the independant front suspension. I thought this was pretty advanced for the time period of the car.

Having so many cars was not good.  I didn’t want to become a keeper of stuff.  You know the guys that keep buying and storing cars with the intention of fixing them some day.  If you stop and think about it for a moment, these guys will never get to working on these cars in a lifetime.  There simply is not enough time in a day for this, not on so many projects.  So why store all of this?  I didn’t want to become one of those guys! 

At the time, I also owned a 5.0l Mustang Cobra convertible for summer fun. I decided to sell the 1931 Ford 5 window coupe and switch the project build to the 1928-29 Ford Roadster using the recently purchased Brookville Roadster body.  It made a bit of sense for me, since I very much enjoy open air driving in the summer time and I figured out how to make a seat work for a person my size.

 

For the next few days, I started to clean up the 1931 Ford 5 window coupe.  It got a very quick flat black paint job and a hand fabricated trunk lid.  I few of the dents were removed and I put the car all together and sat it on a Model A frame.  This was all loaded up on my trailer so I could place the for sale sign on it, on the street outside of my home.  I live on a busy county road with a reasonable amount of traffic.  It sold two days later for $5500.  The fellow that bought it wanted a package deal and it included the body, fibreglass fenders, frame, 350 engine, automatic transmission, a rear end out of a Mustang, and a front axle that came with the 34 Plymouth I just purchased.  Things are starting to look really good in the finance department for building this hot rod of mine.

 

Now it seems that I have finally came up with a plan for the final build of my long awaited hot rod and dream, the 1929 Ford Roadster.

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