Posts Tagged ‘c4 corvette irs’

1929 Ford Model A Ford Roadster Body Modifications – part 2

Monday, October 25th, 2010
 

1929 Ford Model A Ford Roadster Body Modifications – part 2

This past week had a few more 1929 Ford hot rod building distractions. With the fall season there are leaves on lawn needing to be picked up. This job isn’t too bad for me, as I used my lawn tractor with a bagging attachment to mulch and bag the leaves. We have about a one acre property with numerous gardens and many trees, some ornamental and several mature rarer Carolinian trees. Since we do not use chemicals on the property, I just dump the bagged mulch picked up by the lawn tractor directly on the garden beds and underneath the hedges. There is no better fertilizer then this free and soon to be compost. Our Victorian house was built in 1868 and requires a considerable amount of attention. On weekend along with the leaves a bit of chalking around some of the windows and re-glazing many of the old windows with window putty. As a result I only managed to get a few hours in the shop and on the 1929 Ford hot rod towards the end of the day. Even throughout this past week I did manage to get several good evening hours on the hot rod. Now that I am so close to have it completed the commitment to the hot rod is very strong.

1929 Ford Hot Rod Roadster rear body modifications for the custom C4 Corvette hot chassis requires that all of the interior structure for Brookville Roadster rumble seat needs to be removed.  This is neccessary since the chassis now fits between the body rails of theBrookville Roadster body.

1929 Ford Hot Rod Roadster rear body modifications for the custom C4 Corvette hot chassis requires that all of the interior structure for Brookville Roadster rumble seat needs to be removed. This is neccessary since the chassis now fits between the body rails of theBrookville Roadster body.

1929 Ford Hot Rod Roadster rear body modifications required the rear body rails to be notched for the custom C4 Corvette hot rod chassis to fit between the Brookville Roadster body rails along with a floor cross member being moved forward a few inches.  The notch in the body rails might compromise the strength of the body and will required addition support in the body.

1929 Ford Hot Rod Roadster rear body modifications required the rear body rails to be notched for the custom C4 Corvette hot rod chassis to fit between the Brookville Roadster body rails along with a floor cross member being moved forward a few inches. The notch in the body rails might compromise the strength of the body and will required addition support in the body.

1929 Ford Hot Rod Roadster rear body modifications required the addition of this new frame work to strengthen the rear of the Brookville Roadster body.

1929 Ford Hot Rod Roadster rear body modifications required the addition of this new frame work to strengthen the rear of the Brookville Roadster body.

The rear body modifications to the 1929 Ford hot rod using the custom C4 Corvette chassis / frame are almost complete now. With the entire floor and rumble seat structure removed from the Brookville Roadster body http://brookvilleroadster.com/ , strengthening the rear section of the body continues. I created a new frame from 0.75 inch square steel tubing to fit in between existing supporting frame work of the body. Again I felt this was necessary since I had to notch the rear body rails slightly to allow for a bracket mounted to the outside of the C4 Corvette hot rod chassis / frame. I also needed an additional rear body mount to mount the body to the custom hot rod chassis / frame. Part of the chassis design allows me to box in the top of the rear bracket mounting the outside section of the 1986 Corvette ( IRS ) independent rear suspension. This is the bracket mounted to the outside rear of the chassis / frame. This could not work out any better. The plan is to use a hex head bolt to fasten the body to the new custom C4 Corvette hot rod chassis.

1929 Ford Hot Rod Roadster rear body modifications - this new frame is made from 0.75 inch square steel tubing that is welded to exsisting structure located with the Brookville Roadster body.

1929 Ford Hot Rod Roadster rear body modifications - this new frame is made from 0.75 inch square steel tubing that is welded to exsisting structure located with the Brookville Roadster body.

1929 Ford Hot Rod Roadster rear body modifications - with this new frame work in place, there is good rear body support to make up for the notch in the Brookville Roadster body rail and allow for the last rear body mount to fasten the body to the custom C4 Corvette hot rod chassis.

1929 Ford Hot Rod Roadster rear body modifications - with this new frame work in place, there is good rear body support to make up for the notch in the Brookville Roadster body rail and allow for the last rear body mount to fasten the body to the custom C4 Corvette hot rod chassis.

1929 Ford Hot Rod Roadster rear body modifications - additional 0.75 inch square tubing was welded just below the main frame created the strengthen the Brookville Roadster body.  Now the new frame work is also supported by the body rails.  This will add a considerable amount strength to the body and give me the last and most rear body mount.

1929 Ford Hot Rod Roadster rear body modifications - additional 0.75 inch square tubing was welded just below the main frame created the strengthen the Brookville Roadster body. Now the new frame work is also supported by the body rails. This will add a considerable amount strength to the body and give me the last and most rear body mount.

New body frame work was created with a new body to frame mounting bracket welded in place. Now it came time to fit into the body. The new frame fits in between existing body support structure. Using the MIG welder everything was welded permanently in place. This took a bit of care as the 0.75 inch square tubing is thicker then the metal structure on the Brookville Roadster body. Once the welding was completed, everything was ground clean and smooth.

1929 Ford Hot Rod Roadster rear body modifications - now the new frame structure is completed and supported on three sides, the rear body modifications to the Brookville Roadster body is complete and ready for the custom C4 Corvette hot rod chassis.

1929 Ford Hot Rod Roadster rear body modifications - now the new frame structure is completed and supported on three sides, the rear body modifications to the Brookville Roadster body is complete and ready for the custom C4 Corvette hot rod chassis.

Additional 0.75 inch square tubing was welded along the body frame rail and the bottom side of the new frame. This would give me support on three sides and the addition strength in the body I was looking for.

This new structure will now be the mounting base for the trunk interior panels and speakers for the sound system. I also plan to use the space in between the rear chassis / frame rails as a storage compartment with a removal panel for access.

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Installing the Rear Shocks in 1929 Ford with C4 Corvette IRS

Saturday, March 27th, 2010

Installing the Rear Shocks                   

Now it came time to figure out how to mount the rear shocks.  I am using the modified C4 Corvette IRS composite mono spring in the rear of my 1929 Ford Hot Rod.  To control the bounce, shock absorbers will be added to the suspension.  Without any pre-made plans and instructions in hand on how to build this car, everything including the shocks has a bit of trial and error element in the design and build.  I had a set of new gas charged Munroe Shock absorbers bought for my 1988 Cobra Mustang convertible.  Unfortunately, the Cobra convertible was stolen.  This happened in broad daylight, out of a highly visible area in the parking lot at the College I am employed at.  Sometime between 9 and 11am in the morning, somebody wanted the car more than my wife and I did.  Somebody took the car and never returned it!!  This will be another story later on.  As a result, the shocks I purchased never did get used.  Realizing that the Cobra convertible and the 1929 Ford roadster would have a similar weight for the rear of the cars, I thought it might be a good idea to use these shocks in the hot rod. 

1929 Ford Hot Rod - C4 Corvette IRS first attempt at mounting the shocks.  The angle of the shocks was too great.  At this angle the benifit and working abiltiy of the shocks would be greatly reduced and undesirable.

1929 Ford Hot Rod - C4 Corvette IRS first attempt at mounting the shocks. The angle of the shocks was too great. At this angle the benifit and working abiltiy of the shocks would be greatly reduced and undesirable.

My first attempt at mounting the shocks was less than desirable.  The look was not right and the angle of the shock was too great.  Shocks work best when they can be mounted as close to a vertical position as possible.  If not, a shock absorber damping correction factor will need to be applied.  For example, if a shock is mounted 15 degrees from the vertical position, then the shock will be 93 percent effective.  When the shock has a 35 degree mounting angle, then it will be 66 percent effective.  I had just too much of an angle and the shock just did not work very well.  There was just a bit too much bounce in the suspension.  This was not too much of a problem.  It is a good thing that I only tack welded the brackets to the frame.  The upper shocks mount brackets were easily removed.

1929 Ford Hot Rod - C4 Corvette IRS lower shock mount.  This piece was made from 2 inch square stainless steel tubing.  I will end up place a spacer in between the shock mount bracket I made and the receiving end on the wheel assembly.  This will help improve the angle of the shock and provide me with frame clearance at the top end.

1929 Ford Hot Rod - C4 Corvette IRS lower shock mount. This piece was made from 2 inch square stainless steel tubing. I will end up place a spacer in between the shock mount bracket I made and the receiving end on the wheel assembly. This will help improve the angle of the shock and provide me with frame clearance at the top end.

For my second attempt, I decided to move the upper rear shock mounts closer to the frame rail.  The mid section of the shock did not have enough clearance and was hitting the lower edge of the frame.  I already had made a lower shock mount out of 2 inch square stainless steel tubing.  A small spacer between the stainless steel mount and the actual mount on the C4 Corvette lower aluminum shock mount was all I needed.  Now there was just enough clearance and the shock did not hit the lower part of the frame rail.

1929 Ford Hot Rod - C4 Corvette IRS upper shock mount in its final position.  With the extra spacer at the bottom of the shock moving bottom of the shock in towards the center of the chassis and the upper shock mount up against the frame rail, the shock is in a more vertical and desired position.  This even looks better then my first attempt.

1929 Ford Hot Rod - C4 Corvette IRS upper shock mount in its final position. With the extra spacer at the bottom of the shock moving bottom of the shock in towards the center of the chassis and the upper shock mount up against the frame rail, the shock is in a more vertical and more desirable position. This even looks better then my first attempt.

1929 Ford Hot Rod - C4 Corvette IRS upper shock mount in its final position with the shock installed.  This will work much better now and give me good shock perfermance.

1929 Ford Hot Rod - C4 Corvette IRS upper shock mount in its final position with the shock installed. This will work much better now and give me good shock performance.

1929 Ford Hot Rod - C4 Corvette IRS right upper shock mount finished.  You can also see the center mount for the rear end.

1929 Ford Hot Rod - C4 Corvette IRS right upper shock mount finished. You can also see the center mount for the rear end.

1929 Ford Hot Rod - C4 Corvette IRS left upper shock mount finished.  This picture also shows one of the rear body mount and the mount I developed for the rear control arms.

1929 Ford Hot Rod - C4 Corvette IRS left upper shock mount finished. This picture also shows one of the rear body mount and the mount I developed for the rear control arms.

The upper mount in my opinion looks substantially better now and the shock is in a more vertical position.  With a few sand bags in the trunk and my 250 pounds, bouncing up and down on the back end of the 1929 Ford hot rod seemed to give me the right kind of movement and damping effect I was looking for.  Everything was welded into place permanently.  My next step will be to place the rear sway bar on the chassis.  Come back next week for more information on how I did this.

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