Posts Tagged ‘hot rod’

Fleetwood Country Cruize-In: Canada’s Largest Outdoor Car Show June 7 & 8, 2014

Tuesday, May 13th, 2014

Fleetwood Country Cruize-In: Canada’s Largest Outdoor Car Show June 7 & 8, 2014

It is that time of the year again that we can look forward to the annual Fleetwood Country Cruize-In at the Steve Plunkett estate in London, Ontario. This year the show will celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Ford Mustang. The estate is located at 9282 Elviage Dr. London, Ontario. The show will be on June 7 & 8 2014 from 7am to 5pm.

The car show itself has had well over 3000 cars on display, with celebrity appearances by George Barris the “King of Kustomizers”, and American Graffiti stars, Bo Hopkins and Candy Clark, Gene Winfield legendary American Customizer, “Miss Hurst” Linda Vaughn and Courtney Hansen a former host of Overhaulin .

Steve Plunkett will also have is personal collection of cars on display for the public to view in two very nicely finished museums.

The weather has co-operated for each of the years I have attended. Let’s hope the same will be true for the event this year. Who knows what exciting vehicles will be on display this year?

Below are several photos from the show last year.

1955 Mercedes 300slr - picture 2
Golden Sunrise:  picture 1
Willys Coupe Hot Rod
Vintage Cars

Here is a short slide show of the 2013 Fleetwood Country Cruize-In. Just click on an image to make it larger and then click on the arrows at the bottom left or right of the image to advance to the next image. To close the viewer, just click anywhere on the image.

Just click on an image to make it larger and then click on the arrows at the bottom left or right of the image to advance to the next image. To close the viewer, click anywhere on the image.

Share

1928-31 Model A Ford Halogen Headlight Conversion – A Cheap Alternative

Friday, April 25th, 2014

1928-31 Model A Ford Halogen Headlight Conversion – A Cheap Alternative

Some time ago I experimented with a simple and cheap halogen headlight conversion in a set of beat up and very poor condition vintage headlight reflectors. The reflectors came from a pair of original 1928-31 Model A Ford headlight pots. I found that I was able to successfully mate a halogen bulb holder taken from a Ford Mustang headlight to the vintage Model A Ford reflector. Now it came time to replace the reflectors with something a bit better. At a few swap meets I did see aftermarket reflectors for my headlight pots. Since there was a fair bit of work to do on the hot rod, the purchase of the new reflectors was not high on my priority list.

One day while in the shop cleaning up, I was looking at the reflectors I modified for the halogen bulbs and noticed a pair of stainless bowls sitting beside them. I had just purchased the stainless bowls to use in the shop for cleaning small parts. As I was looking at them, I noticed that they appeared to be very similar in size and shape as the Model A Ford reflectors. All of a sudden an idea came to mind, why not use these bowls as reflectors if they fit in the headlight pots. I picked up one of the bowls and placed it in the headlight pot. It fit perfectly!! There was even enough clearance in between the back of the bowl and the headlight pot for the halogen bulb and socket. The bowls came from the Dollar Store had a decent amount of reflective shine on the inside of the bowls. So, this is how my next project developed for the 1929 Ford hot rod.
I already had another set of halogen headlights removed from a Ford Explorer and everything else to make my new reflectors for the hot rod headlights. The day was still early so why not make my rather unconventional headlight reflectors and save a few dollars. In the end the project only cost me $12. The bowls were a $1 each, two new signal light bulbs $5, and a bit of foam seal tape $5. I did sell the first pair of vintage reflectors that I converted on Kijiji for $25.
To purchase new aftermarket chrome plated reflectors with halogen bulbs and amber turn signal bulbs would cost about $100 plus shipping. Sure, my cheap alternative doesn’t have the correct parabolic reflector shape or the best reflective finish. But, do remember, this conversion will offer more lighting than the original reflectors with the stock incandescent light bulbs that came with the headlights back in 1928-31. Secondly, I suspect that I am also using a higher wattage halogen bulb compared to the one that comes with aftermarket kit for the Model A Ford. For now, this will do till I get some of the more expensive parts to finish the hot rod first and on the road. I will have a better idea about the quality of this unconventional and very cheap set-up once I see how the light focuses on the road and the distance of the lighting. Rat rod builders should love this conversion, as they focus on being just a bit different then everyone else, and that’s great that they do. That is what makes this car hobby so very interesting.
Below is a video I took of the process involved with this conversion.

Share