Posts Tagged ‘hot rod’

1928-31 Model A Ford Halogen Headlight Conversion

Wednesday, November 23rd, 2011
  

1928-31 Model A Ford Halogen Headlight Conversion

Several years ago, I purchased at a local automotive swap meet / flea market, a pair of vintage 1928-31 Model A Ford headlights.  Back in 1928, headlights used low light intensity incandescent light bulbs.  This was fine for the day when vehicles didn’t travel very fast or were not in great numbers on our highways.  Now it is best to be seen when you are driving not only at night time but during the day.  So for safety sake, I would suggest using modern light bulbs in your custom car or hot rod.  Headlights now offer improved lighting distances for night driving, and great visibility for being seen on the highway when driving in the day time.  One of my main objectives in the build of my 1929 Model A Ford roadster is to use as many of the modern day safety features in the hot rod as possible.

Original 1928-31 Model A Ford headlight used for the halogen bulb conversion.

As with most things when building a custom car or hot rod, you can buy whatever your heart desires as long as you have the funds.  Another one of my goals in the hot rod is to complete the build as cheaply as possible.  Now with that said, there is the time element.  Whenever you forego the option of buying something and decide to fabricate it yourself, the time to finish the hot rod increases.  For me, it is the challenge to create, fabricate, and develop as much as I possibly can.  This is what will make my 1929 Ford hot rod roadster very unique from all of the others.  Now let’s get to the actual headlight conversion.

Original 1928-31 Model A Ford headlight reflector.

Over the last number of years, I have bought and sold many cars, either in a complete form or parted them to pay for the 1929 Ford hot rod project.  One of these cars was a 1991 Ford Mustang.  I sold many parts from this car, kept several, including the headlights with the intention of converting the old Model A Ford headlights to halogen lighting.  These sat around in the shop for a couple of years before I actually got around to this.  Now that I am very close to having the 1929 Ford hot rod on the road, headlights are important.

mustang-headlight-parts

The first step in my conversion process was to cut out the section that was used to contain and hold the halogen light bulbs.  I used air cut off saw for this.  Of course the friction from the cut off wheel created a bit of heat in the plastic head lamp housing resulting in the plastic to melt around the cut.  This was not a problem for me, as I was intending to mount this roughed out bulb socket from the head lamp into my metal lathe and round it up.  I suppose you could use the drill press and a two inch hole saw for this provided you had a safe way to hold the head lamp housing securely while drilling.

9004xl bulb modifications for 1928-31 Model A Ford Headlights

With the socket removed and turned round on the lathe, place the socket on the Model A Ford head light reflector.  Using a pencil trace the socket outline.  The Model A Ford headlight reflectors that came with my vintage headlight, were not in great shape.  These were perfect for my experiment.  One reflector was all dented and the other had no silver on it.  This conversion will be the proto type for a much better set of reflectors later on. 

Modifications for 1928-31 Model A Ford Headlight reflectors to accept halogen bulbs.

Before I could enlarge the hole in the Model A Ford reflectors, the original headlight sockets needed to be removed.  Using a pair of pliers, the sockets twisted off without any problems.  The die grinder fitted with a variety to burrs. The socket hole was enlarged to the required diameter.  To finish this step off, a larger grinding wheel in the die grinder was used to perfect the shape and diameter.  I did notice that one of the Model A Ford reflectors had very brittle metal causing larger pieces to be torn away rather that ground away.  This was a bit hair raising.  The other reflector was easy to enlarge and did not have the same problem.  I’m not sure why this happened as both reflectors were made of brass?

Completed modifications for 1928-31 Model A Ford Headlight reflectors to accept halogen bulbs.

The modified 1991 Ford Mustang headlight sockets were then attached to the Model A Ford reflectors using only two #6 by 32, half inches screws.

The 1928-31 Model A Ford halogen bulb conversion is complete.

In order for the halogen light bulbs to fit inside the vintage Ford headlights, the back side of the halogen bulb needed to be trimmed.  The rear plastic portion of the bulb shielding the electrical terminal /plug needed to be trimmed even with the electrical terminals on the bulb.  This is also necessary to allow soldering of wires to the terminals.  With the terminals exposed, they now needed to be bent back 90 degrees.  The original wiring plugs for the halogen light bulb was 16 awg, so I soldered new 16 awg wires to the halogen light bulb terminals.  The wires are about 12 inches long.  A plug will be made later on to attach the headlights to the hot rod.

1928-31 Model A Ford halogen conversion using old worn out vintage headlight reflectors.

Five minute epoxy was use to seal the terminals and the newly soldered wire connections on the bulb.

As an in term measure, I decided to paint the Model A Ford reflectors with a high heat silver paint that had decent reflective properties.   These newly modified reflectors using halogen bulb will do till I replace the reflectors later on.  As luck would have it, I found in the workshop two identical stainless steel mixing bowls that would make perfect reflectors in the Model A Ford headlights.  As a future post, I will have a video, showing the entire process of making new headlight reflectors using parts from an old Ford Explorer and the stainless steel mixing bowls.  Both of these conversions will only cost me my time and no out of pocket expense.  I do intend to sell the first set I converted in the next while.  These would be perfect for a daily driver or rat rod.

 

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ISO Metric Bubble Flare for Brakes Lines Made Easy

Wednesday, April 27th, 2011
 

 

ISO Metric Bubble Flare for Brakes Lines Made Easy

When you take on the challenge of building your own car, street rod, hot rod, rat rod, or performing your own automobile repairs, the more skills you have, everything becomes simpler.  This is true when working on a house, technology, or anything else.  One of the draw backs if you want to call it that would be the time element.  The more you can do yourself, the project, whatever it might be, takes longer to complete.  The advantage when doing work yourself, there is sense of satisfaction and pride, not to mention a financial saving.  The financial saving is increasingly becoming a large factor when you look at how everyday living expenses are growing.  Just one simple thing, the cost of fuel, both gas and diesel fuel have increased substantially in the last 3 to 4 months.  The increased cost of getting back and forth to work is diverting money for recreation, hobbies, leisure, and all those other non-essential items. 

Growing up without much money and having a father with many skills, I learnt how to do a lot.  This sometimes is a bit of a curse, as everything takes just a bit longer to complete.  As I see it, if you are intending to build a hot rod, why not learn how to do as much on the car as possible.    

Now it’s time for me to install the brake lines on the 1929 Model A Ford roadster hot rod.  There was a few ways I could tackle this job.  I did have a new coil of 3/16” (0.1875”) steel brake tubing but I needed to purchase all of the fittings and straighten the brake line, not mention I would need to make the ISO metric bubble flares.  Another option was to purchase straight pre-made lengths of brake lines with the correct fittings.   This option seemed to make sense but none of the lines would be an exact fit on the 1929 Ford Roadster hot rod.  Not wanting excessive amounts of brake lines on the frame or chassis, I decided that cutting them to the length I required and re-doing the flare was the best path for me.  I am the sort of person that thrives on learning new things.  This curiosity required me to learn how to make the ISO metric bubble flare.

My 1929 Model A Ford roadster hot rod has C4 Corvette suspension removed from a wrecked 1986 Corvette Indy Pace car.  The brake components from this vintage of Corvette use the ISO Metric bubble flare.  A few years ago, I purchased a rather inexpensive double flaring tool kit.  As with most things, especially with tools, you get what you pay for.  This kit was okay for making a single flare, but inverted double flares would never come out perfectly no matter how careful I was.  I found that there was too much play in many of the parts required to make the inverted double brake line flare.  Oh well, I couldn’t be too disappointed as I only paid $25 for the kit.  Now there is good in everything.  I found this same kit would make a perfect ISO Metric bubble flare every time. 

ISO Metric bubble flare - An example of an in-expensive double flaring tool kit.  Great for single flares and the ISO Metric bubble flare.  This does not make a good double inverted flare.  There is too much play in several of the components.

ISO Metric bubble flare - An example of an in-expensive double flaring tool kit. Great for single flares and the ISO Metric bubble flare. This does not make a good double inverted flare. There is too much play in several of the components.

Having the ability to make good ISO Metric bubble flares,  I felt that purchasing pre-made brake lines longer then I required would be a compromise to this interesting hot rod task.

This first step was to plan a layout for the brake lines and then approximate the lengths of all needed brake lines.  Then I went off to see my friends at NAPA and purchased what I needed to completed the job.  My intention is to shorten the lines I purchased from NAPA to the exact length required for the 1929 Ford roadster hot rod.

In order to create perfectly shaped brake lines, I used 0.125 inch ( 1/8th”) wire and created the required shapes for all brake lines.  These then became templates for the actual brake lines.  Carefully measuring all of the templates, all brake lines were cut to size allowing an extra 0.25 inches ( ¼” inch) for the bubble flare.   Once the tubing was cut, I used a soft wire wheel on the stationary grinder to de-burr the cut tubing.  This is fast and produces a nicely finished cut tube.  Of course you can also use the de-burring tool usually supplied with the flaring  tool kit, but with the cheaper kit I purchased, I found that it did not work all that well.   

ISO Metric bubble flare - An example of a wire template for accurate brake line bending.  A 0.125" or 1/8" wire was used to pre-shape the actual brake line.  This is a real time saving tip.

ISO Metric bubble flare - An example of a wire template for accurate brake line bending. A 0.125" or 1/8" wire was used to pre-shape the actual brake line. This is a real time saving tip.

The next most important step is to install the brake line fittings with the correct orientation.  Now mount the brake tubing into the flaring bar such that the freshly cut tubing is facing the flat side of the flaring bar and the flat side of the flaring bar is facing in an upward direction.   For 0.1875 inch (3/16”) tubing leave about 0.25 inch (1/4”) exposed from the face of the flaring bar.

ISO Metric bubble flare - Getting ready to make the ISO Metric bubble flare.  The flat side of the flaring bar is facing upwards and about 0.25" or 1/4" of the 0.1875" or 3/16" tubing is exposed from the face of the flaring bar.  The flaring bar needs to be firmly tightened to prevent any movement during the flaring process.

ISO Metric bubble flare - Getting ready to make the ISO Metric bubble flare. The flat side of the flaring bar is facing upwards and about 0.25" or 1/4" of the 0.1875" or 3/16" tubing is exposed from the face of the flaring bar. The flaring bar needs to be firmly tightened to prevent any movement during the flaring process.

For a quality flare, mount the flaring bar with the clamped tubing into a bench vice.  This will prevent un-necessary movement during the flaring process and make the alignment of the flaring yoke and inverted flaring adapter button easier.

ISO Metric bubble flare - Ready to make the flare.  The flaring yoke and inverted flaring adapter are set up squarely onto the clamped brake tubing.  Perfect alignment at this point in very important in order to make a perfect bubble flare.

ISO Metric bubble flare - Ready to make the flare. The flaring yoke and inverted flaring adapter are set up squarely onto the clamped brake tubing. Perfect alignment at this point in very important in order to make a perfect bubble flare.

Once everything is lined up perfectly, tighten the flaring yoke onto the tubing.  Do not over tighten the flaring yoke as excessive force will destroy the flare.  It would be a good idea to make a few practice flares on some scrap tubing before making the bubble flares on brake lines that will be used on a car.

With the flare complete, remove the flaring yoke, inverted flaring adapter button, and remove the tubing from the flaring bar.  I have noticed that the flaring process does reduce the hole opening on the tubing and would restrict the flow of brake fluid to a minor extent.  To optimized the brake line, I use a 0.125 inch (1/8”) drill bit to ream out the hole opening.  The brake line will need to be clamped in a bench vice for this optional step. 

ISO Metric bubble flare - optional step - drill the opening carefully with a 0.125" or 1/8" drill bit to open up the flare.  This will improve fluid flow once installed.

ISO Metric bubble flare - optional step - drill the opening carefully with a 0.125" or 1/8" drill bit to open up the flare. This will improve fluid flow once installed.

ISO Metric bubble flare - The complete bubble flare as used on the 1929 Ford roadster hot rod.

ISO Metric bubble flare - The complete bubble flare as used on the 1929 Ford roadster hot rod.

To make everything easier to visualize, I created a short video of making an ISO Metric bubble flare.  Just click on the link below to watch the video.

 Fast Tube
Fast Tube by Casper

I am going to give this a try and use Facebook for 1929fordhotrod.com.  Let’s see how this works out.  Below is a like button that you can use if you like the information on this website or just visit my Facebook page.


 

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Money making distractions

Friday, November 27th, 2009

Money making distractions – Part 1

I have been building and fixing things my entire life and have an excellent mechanical sense.  I was fortunate to have a father that was patient with me and taught me all kinds of interesting things.  In my early days, I apprenticed as a heavy equipment diesel mechanic in the mines in Northern Ontario.  Now I am an Electronics Professor and Program Coordinator for the Electrical / Electronic Engineering Technology program at my College here in Southern Ontario, Canada.  Everything that I have done up to now has allowed me to design and build such a unique hot rod.  More on that later.

The 1931 Plymouth engine - very basic and easy to work on.

The 1931 Plymouth engine - very basic and easy to work on.

 

Without any instruction manual, I started to assemble the pieces for the distributor for the 1931 Plymouth.  Remember, I found the distributor in the car, in a box.   It was totally dismantled.  The distributor was assembled by me and then taken apart again many times.  I was lucky, no parts were missing.  I worked at it till I thought it was right.  This was no 5 minute job to assemble this part.  This is just a small sample of how the simplest things can take hours and hours of your day.  So, if you think you want to build a hot rod, or even restore a vintage vehicle, and cannot spare a regular amount of time, and I mean lots and lots of time, you might want to consider finding something else to do.  Remember, anybody can do anything they want to do, all you need is the determination and willpower to do it.  Information is knowledge and also is power.  Secondly, you better love what you do.  If you don’t, then everything about a project is a chore.  You might well wonder who would love getting dirty, greasy, and occasionally setting your sleeve on fire while grinding metal parts.  Fun is what you make of it.  Many people asked me how I learned all the skills needed to do this project.  The quick answer is from books, and doing lots of reading, and research, backed up with lots of questions directed to people that have the knowledge.  Finally the fastest way to learn something is just to do it.  Trial and error is a fine teacher.

The 1931 Plymouth engine - everything is so easy to get at.

The 1931 Plymouth engine - everything is so easy to get at.

 

Money making distractions – Part 2

It came time to put the distributor into the engine.  The fellow I bought the car from was somewhat correct about the distributor.  It would not lock into place and it just spun freely and would not turn with in sequence with the crank.  After a very careful look at the distributor shaft housing entering the engine block, I notice about a ½” spacing to a ridge on the distributor housing.  I pulled the distributor and took a close look at the bottom end of the shaft.  Things started to make sense.  The distributor went back into the engine block.  Only this time, I had a rubber mallet in my other hand.  With a few gentle taps and careful rotation of the distributor shaft, I found the point when the shaft quit turning freely, and gave the top of the shaft one good tap.  The distributor went in all of the way, to the bottom of the ridge of the distributor.  Needing to know if this was going to work, I wanted to turn the engine over.  Well, these old cars work off of 6 volts and guess what?  In my shop, I only have a 12v battery and a 6v/12v battery charger.  The battery charger will not provide the current needed for the starter.  Knowing a little about motors and electronics, I used the 12v battery to make the starter to work and turn the engine for very short period of time.  Success, the distributor was turning.  Not wanting to burn out the 6v ignition coil, I used my old battery charger that had a 6v setting to provide power for the ignition system.  I powered up the starter a second time, and had spark to the spark plugs.  This was getting all pretty exciting.  Now, I need to set the timing of the engine.  Luck was with me.  I had a reproduction copy of the original owner’s manual for this car. I was able to set the timing and tried to start the car a third time.  It would not start.  There was lots of spark, so I had a fuel problem.  Off came the carburetor.  I took it apart and gave it one very good cleaning.   Another couple of hours of disappeared.  I haven’t even started building a hot rod yet, I am just working on a 73 year-old motor.  I am not sure why I am doing this, but I am.  It came time to reinstall the carburetor and try this out again.  On my fourth try, success!  This 73 year old engine runs.  What a rush.  I stopped it and gave it another try.  This thing starts as good as my high performance fuel injected Mustang.  This was totally amazing.  Feeling pretty good, I ran to the house to get my best friend, my wife, Jan.  I wanted to show her how well this old engine ran.  She agreed to come out to the shop.

Money making distractions – Part 3  

1930 Plymouth distributor - This is simialar to the 31.  This picture was done on my HP scanner.  I didn't have a digital camera at that time.

1930 Plymouth distributor - This is simialar to the 31. This picture was done on my HP scanner. I didn't have a digital camera at that time.

1930 Plymouth distributor - Cleaned up and nicely painted in a gloss black paint.  I sold this one on EBay.

1930 Plymouth distributor - Cleaned up and nicely painted in a gloss black paint. I sold this one on EBay.

 

I must say, my wife has been a real sport about this car hobby of mine.  My wife often shakes her head in amazement with all of my wheeling and dealing.  Money out of our pockets and money back in our pockets.  Often more then I started with.  Cars, and parts, come and go.  Parts are slowly getting packed and shipped away.    This is all part of the story that goes along with building my hot rod.

With Jan in the shop, I started the engine.  After a few minutes, she asks me, if the battery charger should have smoke coming out of if.  I thought she was joking.  I stretched my neck over the hood to check out the battery charger.  She was right.  I stopped the engine and that was the end of my poor old battery charger.  Even though, I am an Electronics Professor, my excitement took charge, and I neglected some basic electronics.  The battery charger could not provide enough current for the ignition system.  I over loaded the battery charger, and turned it into a bit of junk.  Oh well, not so bad, I got a 73 year old engine running.  After a couple of days, I realized that a vintage vehicle was not in my plans, I want to hot rod a car.  I needed to sell the car and more importantly, I needed the space in the shop. 

Money making distractions – Part 4

This car was now running and pretty much complete.  I took a few pictures, scanned them, and created an ad for Old AutosOld Autos is a Canadian auto enthusiast newspaper published twice a month, in Bothwell, Ontario and is a must for anybody getting into vintage cars or hot rods.    

 

1931 plymouth for sale, I'm not interested in keeping a vintage car.  I put it all back together again and manage to get the engine running.  What a thrill that was.  This car starts just as easy as my high performance 5.0L Mustang Cobra!

1931 plymouth for sale, I'm not interested in keeping a vintage car. I put it all back together again and manage to get the engine running. What a thrill that was. This car starts just as easy as my high performance 5.0L Mustang Cobra!

 

1931 plymouth interior, sort of rought but the car is almost 80 years old!

1931 plymouth interior, sort of rought but the car is almost 80 years old!

 

The ad for the car was placed.  The first day the paper was out in the hands of other old car hobbyist, I had a couple of calls.  The next day the first person came to look at the car.  He was a retired high school principle.  He liked what he saw, and I sold it to him for $3200.  Not bad, I bought two cars for $3500 and sold one for $3200.  This was a good profit for a few days work.    I was only into the 1930 Plymouth for $300 now and it still hasn’t even been delivered to me yet.  Finally the 1930 Plymouth arrived.  The fellow that sold me the cars asked if I sold the 31.  He also subscribes to Old Autos and most likely saw my ad.  I said yes, and the look on his face changed to a look of surprise and maybe anger.  I wonder why?  This fellow would not talk to me for about 2 years when our paths crossed at local swap meets or cruises.  You might find this interesting, the high school principle that bought the 31 Plymouth, never did anything with the car but store it.  A few years later, he tried to sell the car for $4700, but without success.  The morale of this story is making sure this is what you really want to do.  You do not want to become a keeper to things.  Remember the guys I mentioned earlier, they are warehouse keepers, and collectors, never building much.

 

1930 Plymouth arriving at my shop.

1930 Plymouth arriving at my shop.

For the next few weeks I removed everything that I did not need on the car.  I remembered something the fellow that sold me the two Plymouths.  He told me he could sell bits and pieces and make lots of money.  I never did thank this gentleman for this bit of information.  You will see why as you read on about my quest to building unique1929 Ford roadster hot rod. 

 

1930 Plymouth in the shop.  Now comes the job of stripping the car down.

1930 Plymouth in the shop. Now comes the job of stripping the car down.

After a search on EBay, I noticed that the parts I removed and did not need, had been selling for large amounts of money.  So the next part of the hot rod quest has started.  I spent an enormous amount of time looking up information on EBay for the parts that I had and wanted to sell.  Remember what I said earlier, information is power.  I will explain.  Let the games begin!!  How much money can I make?

Stayed tuned, my next section will be about my experience on EBay, selling parts, making money, at a price of not working on my hot rod.

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So you want to build a hot rod, where do you start?

Thursday, November 26th, 2009

 

How to Build a 1929 Ford Hot Rod

By: John A. Ansons

1929fordhotrod.com logo

1929fordhotrod.com logo

 

The inexpensive way

Using Imagination, ingenuity, and determination

Not just cheap, but a high quality build

Catch your interest, read on……

1929 Ford Hot Rod

 

Introduction.

John Ansons and his 1929 Ford Hotrod live in Strathroy, Ontario, Canada . The story of this car is a rather twisting and complex one that started with the purchase of two old and rather tattered Plymouths in 2004. There is trading and piecing together. Selling, bartering, designing, and building of parts such as the frame and other parts. There is tearing down, fabricating, parts transplants, There is money in and money out. But the most interesting financial aspect of the finances of this project is that in the end the “in” and the “out” of it is almost even. This project cost very little in terms of money. What it did cost was supplemented with a lot of thought, even more imagination and ingenuity, stubbornness and the determination to see it finished.

It is also a matter of some pride that it was done with little money and a lot of hard work. It is easy, with pockets that go deep enough to have a brilliant polished project parked in the driveway for all to see. That, is easy. (Written by: J. L. Reilly my best friend, partner, and best of all, my wife of 4 and 30 years.  Thanks, Janis)

So you want to build a hot rod, where do you start? – Part 1 

The journey begins here.

This all started when I was growing up in a small mining town in Northern Ontario.  We always made things and fixed everything. It was a necessity of the time.  A regular part of the routine was fixing up old beater cars used for everyday transportation.  There was a succession of many $25 and $50 cars.  Add a bottle of rye for a mechanic and you had a safety check and a “new” daily driver.  Boy things have changed.  That is a good thing. 

Like most kids, I was in there like a dirty shirt, helping my father out the best I could.  Probably, I was in the way most of the time, but he never said word about it.  Fairly early on, I wanted a snowmobile.  Of course we could not afford one.  One day, my father came home with one.  A strange looking thing called a Snow Bug.  I looked at this thing and thought “this thing is outright weird”.  Necessity overcame pride and this is what I had, so I worked with it.  Snow Bugs were not like normal snowmobiles, these had the motor in the back and you sat on a seat in the front on top of the ski.  They had a 24″ wide track and only one wide ski in the front.  They were made out of aluminum and not painted.  The one my dad brought home was in pieces,   lots of pieces.   With my father working all of the time, I became impatient and started to put this thing back together.  There was far more pushing it home than driving it, and lots of regular repairs.  That Snow Bug taught me lots about engines, pulley and gear ratios.

When I started High School I made many visits to the variety store during lunch breaks, checking out the magazine racks.  Magazines on Hot Rods and Dune Buggies caught my interest.  I could not find an old car like the early 30′s Fords that I liked, but we had lots of old VW beetles kicking around.  The Baja Sand Rails and classic dune buggies looked attractive.  The fibre glass body was out of the question for obvious reasons, but I did have access to an oxygen/acetylene cutting and welding set.  Lots of old water pipe was easily accessible for the right price, free.  So, I went to design and build my first VW dune buggy, in the style of the Sand Rail.  I found lots of pictures in various magazines.  They became my blueprint.  This was at the ripe old age of 13.  Now we call builds like this, Rat Rods.

So you want to build a hot rod – Part 2

Being left alone at home during the summer time, I had lots of time to learn how to use the torch and gas weld.  No problem here. I watched my father do this many times.  I found out quickly, that watching somebody do something is not the same as doing it yourself.  This still holds true.  To think of this now, it must have been scary, driving this contraption, built with elementary welding knowledge.  I must have done all right, I am still here to tell this story.  

Of course, growing up in a mining town, and having a father that knew how to do and try lots of things also helped.  He was my resource and supplier of parts.  Growing up poor and having to learn how to fix everything, and make all sorts of improvisations to keep up with the Jones’ also had an important role.  Incidentally, the Jones’ did live down the street from me.  I find it interesting how life’s early beginnings set the path for what you end up doing later in life.

About 5 years ago, I came up with the idea of building a hot rod.  I researched the idea of building an AC Cobra kit car and came up with a fabricator and supplier about 2 hours from home.  Everything about building a Cobra seemed very expensive.  This didn’t make any sense at all.  We still had young kids at home, a mortgage, just trying to make it to the end of the month was a challenge.  I decided to end future frustration before it began. I let the idea die an early death.

The Internet is an excellent resource for research.  I found many books on building cars of all types.  How to Build a Sports Car For as Little as 250 Pounds by Ron Champion was very interesting and exactly what I wanted to do.  This book had possibilities and looked very appealing.  Why did this interest me?  Everything could be completed cheaply, and the use of an old four banger car was easy to find.  With titles and ISBN numbers in hand, off I went to the library to search for titles I found on the Internet.  Of course, living in a small town has disadvantages in this department.  None of the titles I was looking for were available locally.  I did find one book on the shelf, Street Rodder’s Handbook by Frank Oddo.  This had a good amount of basic information that I needed to start with.  Knowing the librarian, I asked her to make inter-library loans for the books that I had on my list.  The library is a great place and an excellent resource.  Many of these books took weeks to arrive, and many never did.  Every week I would provide the elderly librarian a new list.  I think she was starting to get just a bit annoyed with me.  In one of our conversions, I told her she will get a ride in the hot rod that I build when it is completed.  She is holding me to it.

I started to do lots of reading.  Magazines started to come home by the cart load.  After many discussions with my best friend, who just happens to be my wife, I decided search out a car. 

We have an expression here at home, “when you start looking for something, you always find it”.  This holds true for everything, from houses to furniture and everything else you can imagine.  An adult student and hot rodder that I was teaching electronics at the time at a local community college I work at gave me a copy of an Old Autos newspaper.  Old Autos is published twice a month, in Bothwell, Ontario and is a must for anybody getting into vintage cars or hot rods.

So you want to build a hot rod – Part 3

The paper I received was several months old, but I still looked at the want ad section.  There was an ad for two cars about 30 minutes from home.  Perfect!  One 1930 and one 1931 Plymouth four door cars for $3500.  I made a call, and discovered this person still had both cars.  We arranged a time for me to view the cars.  I was excited.  Who would have thought I could find something so fast and so close to home.  Remember the expression, “when you start looking for something, you always find it”!  It’s true.  Away, I went in my Mustang convertible, top down, and for a drive to this fellow’s house, on a nice sunny day.  When I arrived, I noticed this fellow had a big collection of Plymouths and a lot of other junk, all in need of work, lots of work.  My guess is that if this fellow lives to be 150, he will never finish all of these cars.  In fact, I do not think this fellow has ever finished a car for himself. 

 

1930 plymouth hanging from the shop ceiling

1930 plymouth hanging from the shop ceiling

1931 plymouth hanging from the shop ceiling

1931 plymouth hanging from the shop ceiling

 

Upon entry to his shop, I found more cars and stuff.  The Plymouths I came to look at, were on top of each other to my amazement.  The ‘30 Plymouth was hanging on chains from the ceiling, only inches from the roof of the ‘31 Plymouth resting on the shop floor.  Cars were packed in like sardines in a can.  He had an old truck chassis on small coasters, and pulled it away from the Plymouths.  Bearings from the coasters, started to bounce and roll across the floor.  The weight of the chassis was just too much for the little wheeled coasters.  I started to wonder what I was getting into.  You would have to think about this.  Putting a heavy chassis on rollers meant for a small cabinet.  This did not make sense. I wondered what kind of builder this person was?  Finally, I was able to check the cars out.  The ‘30 Plymouth had a complete body with bits and pieces of the mechanical parts missing and all sorts of things piled inside the car.  The ‘31 was totally complete with engine sitting on the floor in pieces ready to be reassembled.  I was only interested in one car, the ‘30 Plymouth.  It did not look like it would ever be put back together in its original form.  It made the most sense to turn this one into a hot rod. I only wanted the ‘30 Plymouth, but this fellow would not separate them.  Maybe he thought they were sisters and needed to be in the same home.  This was a problem for me, I did not want sisters.  My shop is small and loaded with woodworking equipment and lots of wood.  I simply did not have the space.  This required a bit of thought.  More like a lot of thought.  So I went home to think about this and talk this all over with my best friend, my wife.  Please remember one thing, if you want to stay married, you better have the support of your spouse.  Life is too short for conflict. 

In the mean time, I started to clean and organize the shop.  A bit more space was made, but still not enough room for two very old cars.  After thinking this all over for about a week, I decided another trip to see the cars was in order.  One more drive on a sunny day in my Mustang convertible.  It doesn’t get any better than that.  Go for a drive, smell the roses and enjoy life.  During my visit with this fellow and looking at the cars again, he started talking about cutting up the cars and selling all of the pieces, making him far more then the $3500 he was asking for both cars.  I am not sure what this was all about, maybe a bit of pressure, maybe just a bunch of loose talk.  Then he mentioned that he would even deliver the cars to my house.  Not, liking the high pressure of selling, off I went back home to think about this some more and clean up the shop a bit more.  After a few days, I gave the fellow a call and said okay lets make a deal.  He asked me if I wanted the engine put back together.   This made a lot of sense since I did not take it apart and it would take me longer to figure out than it would take this guy.  The best thing of all was he was not going to charge me any extra for this.  He wanted me to buy a 8 cylinder distributor he modified for the old four-cylinder Plymouth engine.  His rationale was that the original distributor did not turn in the engine.  Something didn’t click with me on this one and I decided to pass on his modified distributor.  A few days later, the ‘31 Plymouth arrived at my place.  We unloaded the car and pushed it into the shop.  We made arrangements for the ‘30 Plymouth’s delivery in about a week.  It was getting late, so he went home, and I stayed in the shop staring at my acquisition.  What was I getting into??  The next day I started unloading some of the boxes inside the car and came across the vintage distributor for the car.  This fellow must have liked ripping things apart.  Every part that could be taken off the distributor was sitting loose in the box.  Why would anybody do that?  Maybe just busy work?    

1931 plymouth still on the trailer outsided my shop

1931 plymouth still on the trailer outsided my shop

1931 plymouth delivered outside my shop

1931 plymouth delivered outside my shop

1931 plymouth ready to roll into my shop

1931 plymouth ready to roll into my shop

 

So you want to build a hot rod – Part 4

Some people are hard to figure out in this hobby.  I have seen people buy all kinds of cars and parts, but never do anything with them other than store them.  Eventually some people end up with warehouses of stuff!  One thing I have learnt is that you need to stay focussed.  Have a plan and stick to it.  This is especially for the first time builder, only buy what you need for the stage you are at and do not get anything that you think you might use or need just because it is cheap.  You are not a bird chasing after shiny things!  I have bought many items on EBay and at swap meets.  Some I have used, and many items are either still sitting in the shop, or have been re-sold.  Many of the items I have re-sold have been sold for a profit.  This was fortunate, and may not always be the case.   Of course, the profit on these items sold did lower my overall build cost.  With a small shop out of necessity I developed the policy if I have not used something in two years I sell it.  I have found things in my shop that I forgot I had, so if I forgot about them, it makes perfect sense to sell these items.    

Go to cruises and ask lots of questions.  Most car builders are flattered when you take an interest in their car by asking questions.  You should even take pictures of cars similar to the car you are building.  This is not for the purpose of copying someone else’s ideas.  It is good to develop your own reference library.  You always think that you are going to remember a great idea.  Inevitably you will forget it by the time you get to that point on your own build.  Worse you will remember you saw a great idea, just not what it was exactly. With digital cameras it never has been easier to take pictures.

Finally, when you are out looking at other people’s work, leave the “Critic” at home.  I have heard some people comment on the builder’s methods and choice of materials loud and long.  You mark yourself as a ignorant bore or worse.  Often those comments come from people that do not have there own car or have not built their own hot rod. The people with the most advice are the ones who do the least.  Remember, if you can’t say anything good, don’t say it.

So you say, what does this have to do with a 1929 Ford Hot Rod?  Well, it’s the start of an interesting journey.  You will have to read on. 

 Money making distractions will be the next section.

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