Posts Tagged ‘Model A Ford’

ISO Metric Bubble Flare for Brakes Lines Made Easy

Wednesday, April 27th, 2011
 

 

ISO Metric Bubble Flare for Brakes Lines Made Easy

When you take on the challenge of building your own car, street rod, hot rod, rat rod, or performing your own automobile repairs, the more skills you have, everything becomes simpler.  This is true when working on a house, technology, or anything else.  One of the draw backs if you want to call it that would be the time element.  The more you can do yourself, the project, whatever it might be, takes longer to complete.  The advantage when doing work yourself, there is sense of satisfaction and pride, not to mention a financial saving.  The financial saving is increasingly becoming a large factor when you look at how everyday living expenses are growing.  Just one simple thing, the cost of fuel, both gas and diesel fuel have increased substantially in the last 3 to 4 months.  The increased cost of getting back and forth to work is diverting money for recreation, hobbies, leisure, and all those other non-essential items. 

Growing up without much money and having a father with many skills, I learnt how to do a lot.  This sometimes is a bit of a curse, as everything takes just a bit longer to complete.  As I see it, if you are intending to build a hot rod, why not learn how to do as much on the car as possible.    

Now it’s time for me to install the brake lines on the 1929 Model A Ford roadster hot rod.  There was a few ways I could tackle this job.  I did have a new coil of 3/16” (0.1875”) steel brake tubing but I needed to purchase all of the fittings and straighten the brake line, not mention I would need to make the ISO metric bubble flares.  Another option was to purchase straight pre-made lengths of brake lines with the correct fittings.   This option seemed to make sense but none of the lines would be an exact fit on the 1929 Ford Roadster hot rod.  Not wanting excessive amounts of brake lines on the frame or chassis, I decided that cutting them to the length I required and re-doing the flare was the best path for me.  I am the sort of person that thrives on learning new things.  This curiosity required me to learn how to make the ISO metric bubble flare.

My 1929 Model A Ford roadster hot rod has C4 Corvette suspension removed from a wrecked 1986 Corvette Indy Pace car.  The brake components from this vintage of Corvette use the ISO Metric bubble flare.  A few years ago, I purchased a rather inexpensive double flaring tool kit.  As with most things, especially with tools, you get what you pay for.  This kit was okay for making a single flare, but inverted double flares would never come out perfectly no matter how careful I was.  I found that there was too much play in many of the parts required to make the inverted double brake line flare.  Oh well, I couldn’t be too disappointed as I only paid $25 for the kit.  Now there is good in everything.  I found this same kit would make a perfect ISO Metric bubble flare every time. 

ISO Metric bubble flare - An example of an in-expensive double flaring tool kit.  Great for single flares and the ISO Metric bubble flare.  This does not make a good double inverted flare.  There is too much play in several of the components.

ISO Metric bubble flare - An example of an in-expensive double flaring tool kit. Great for single flares and the ISO Metric bubble flare. This does not make a good double inverted flare. There is too much play in several of the components.

Having the ability to make good ISO Metric bubble flares,  I felt that purchasing pre-made brake lines longer then I required would be a compromise to this interesting hot rod task.

This first step was to plan a layout for the brake lines and then approximate the lengths of all needed brake lines.  Then I went off to see my friends at NAPA and purchased what I needed to completed the job.  My intention is to shorten the lines I purchased from NAPA to the exact length required for the 1929 Ford roadster hot rod.

In order to create perfectly shaped brake lines, I used 0.125 inch ( 1/8th”) wire and created the required shapes for all brake lines.  These then became templates for the actual brake lines.  Carefully measuring all of the templates, all brake lines were cut to size allowing an extra 0.25 inches ( ¼” inch) for the bubble flare.   Once the tubing was cut, I used a soft wire wheel on the stationary grinder to de-burr the cut tubing.  This is fast and produces a nicely finished cut tube.  Of course you can also use the de-burring tool usually supplied with the flaring  tool kit, but with the cheaper kit I purchased, I found that it did not work all that well.   

ISO Metric bubble flare - An example of a wire template for accurate brake line bending.  A 0.125" or 1/8" wire was used to pre-shape the actual brake line.  This is a real time saving tip.

ISO Metric bubble flare - An example of a wire template for accurate brake line bending. A 0.125" or 1/8" wire was used to pre-shape the actual brake line. This is a real time saving tip.

The next most important step is to install the brake line fittings with the correct orientation.  Now mount the brake tubing into the flaring bar such that the freshly cut tubing is facing the flat side of the flaring bar and the flat side of the flaring bar is facing in an upward direction.   For 0.1875 inch (3/16”) tubing leave about 0.25 inch (1/4”) exposed from the face of the flaring bar.

ISO Metric bubble flare - Getting ready to make the ISO Metric bubble flare.  The flat side of the flaring bar is facing upwards and about 0.25" or 1/4" of the 0.1875" or 3/16" tubing is exposed from the face of the flaring bar.  The flaring bar needs to be firmly tightened to prevent any movement during the flaring process.

ISO Metric bubble flare - Getting ready to make the ISO Metric bubble flare. The flat side of the flaring bar is facing upwards and about 0.25" or 1/4" of the 0.1875" or 3/16" tubing is exposed from the face of the flaring bar. The flaring bar needs to be firmly tightened to prevent any movement during the flaring process.

For a quality flare, mount the flaring bar with the clamped tubing into a bench vice.  This will prevent un-necessary movement during the flaring process and make the alignment of the flaring yoke and inverted flaring adapter button easier.

ISO Metric bubble flare - Ready to make the flare.  The flaring yoke and inverted flaring adapter are set up squarely onto the clamped brake tubing.  Perfect alignment at this point in very important in order to make a perfect bubble flare.

ISO Metric bubble flare - Ready to make the flare. The flaring yoke and inverted flaring adapter are set up squarely onto the clamped brake tubing. Perfect alignment at this point in very important in order to make a perfect bubble flare.

Once everything is lined up perfectly, tighten the flaring yoke onto the tubing.  Do not over tighten the flaring yoke as excessive force will destroy the flare.  It would be a good idea to make a few practice flares on some scrap tubing before making the bubble flares on brake lines that will be used on a car.

With the flare complete, remove the flaring yoke, inverted flaring adapter button, and remove the tubing from the flaring bar.  I have noticed that the flaring process does reduce the hole opening on the tubing and would restrict the flow of brake fluid to a minor extent.  To optimized the brake line, I use a 0.125 inch (1/8”) drill bit to ream out the hole opening.  The brake line will need to be clamped in a bench vice for this optional step. 

ISO Metric bubble flare - optional step - drill the opening carefully with a 0.125" or 1/8" drill bit to open up the flare.  This will improve fluid flow once installed.

ISO Metric bubble flare - optional step - drill the opening carefully with a 0.125" or 1/8" drill bit to open up the flare. This will improve fluid flow once installed.

ISO Metric bubble flare - The complete bubble flare as used on the 1929 Ford roadster hot rod.

ISO Metric bubble flare - The complete bubble flare as used on the 1929 Ford roadster hot rod.

To make everything easier to visualize, I created a short video of making an ISO Metric bubble flare.  Just click on the link below to watch the video.

 Fast Tube
Fast Tube by Casper

I am going to give this a try and use Facebook for 1929fordhotrod.com.  Let’s see how this works out.  Below is a like button that you can use if you like the information on this website or just visit my Facebook page.


 

Share

1929 Ford Model A Ford Roadster Body Modifications – part 2

Monday, October 25th, 2010
 

1929 Ford Model A Ford Roadster Body Modifications – part 2

This past week had a few more 1929 Ford hot rod building distractions. With the fall season there are leaves on lawn needing to be picked up. This job isn’t too bad for me, as I used my lawn tractor with a bagging attachment to mulch and bag the leaves. We have about a one acre property with numerous gardens and many trees, some ornamental and several mature rarer Carolinian trees. Since we do not use chemicals on the property, I just dump the bagged mulch picked up by the lawn tractor directly on the garden beds and underneath the hedges. There is no better fertilizer then this free and soon to be compost. Our Victorian house was built in 1868 and requires a considerable amount of attention. On weekend along with the leaves a bit of chalking around some of the windows and re-glazing many of the old windows with window putty. As a result I only managed to get a few hours in the shop and on the 1929 Ford hot rod towards the end of the day. Even throughout this past week I did manage to get several good evening hours on the hot rod. Now that I am so close to have it completed the commitment to the hot rod is very strong.

1929 Ford Hot Rod Roadster rear body modifications for the custom C4 Corvette hot chassis requires that all of the interior structure for Brookville Roadster rumble seat needs to be removed.  This is neccessary since the chassis now fits between the body rails of theBrookville Roadster body.

1929 Ford Hot Rod Roadster rear body modifications for the custom C4 Corvette hot chassis requires that all of the interior structure for Brookville Roadster rumble seat needs to be removed. This is neccessary since the chassis now fits between the body rails of theBrookville Roadster body.

1929 Ford Hot Rod Roadster rear body modifications required the rear body rails to be notched for the custom C4 Corvette hot rod chassis to fit between the Brookville Roadster body rails along with a floor cross member being moved forward a few inches.  The notch in the body rails might compromise the strength of the body and will required addition support in the body.

1929 Ford Hot Rod Roadster rear body modifications required the rear body rails to be notched for the custom C4 Corvette hot rod chassis to fit between the Brookville Roadster body rails along with a floor cross member being moved forward a few inches. The notch in the body rails might compromise the strength of the body and will required addition support in the body.

1929 Ford Hot Rod Roadster rear body modifications required the addition of this new frame work to strengthen the rear of the Brookville Roadster body.

1929 Ford Hot Rod Roadster rear body modifications required the addition of this new frame work to strengthen the rear of the Brookville Roadster body.

The rear body modifications to the 1929 Ford hot rod using the custom C4 Corvette chassis / frame are almost complete now. With the entire floor and rumble seat structure removed from the Brookville Roadster body http://brookvilleroadster.com/ , strengthening the rear section of the body continues. I created a new frame from 0.75 inch square steel tubing to fit in between existing supporting frame work of the body. Again I felt this was necessary since I had to notch the rear body rails slightly to allow for a bracket mounted to the outside of the C4 Corvette hot rod chassis / frame. I also needed an additional rear body mount to mount the body to the custom hot rod chassis / frame. Part of the chassis design allows me to box in the top of the rear bracket mounting the outside section of the 1986 Corvette ( IRS ) independent rear suspension. This is the bracket mounted to the outside rear of the chassis / frame. This could not work out any better. The plan is to use a hex head bolt to fasten the body to the new custom C4 Corvette hot rod chassis.

1929 Ford Hot Rod Roadster rear body modifications - this new frame is made from 0.75 inch square steel tubing that is welded to exsisting structure located with the Brookville Roadster body.

1929 Ford Hot Rod Roadster rear body modifications - this new frame is made from 0.75 inch square steel tubing that is welded to exsisting structure located with the Brookville Roadster body.

1929 Ford Hot Rod Roadster rear body modifications - with this new frame work in place, there is good rear body support to make up for the notch in the Brookville Roadster body rail and allow for the last rear body mount to fasten the body to the custom C4 Corvette hot rod chassis.

1929 Ford Hot Rod Roadster rear body modifications - with this new frame work in place, there is good rear body support to make up for the notch in the Brookville Roadster body rail and allow for the last rear body mount to fasten the body to the custom C4 Corvette hot rod chassis.

1929 Ford Hot Rod Roadster rear body modifications - additional 0.75 inch square tubing was welded just below the main frame created the strengthen the Brookville Roadster body.  Now the new frame work is also supported by the body rails.  This will add a considerable amount strength to the body and give me the last and most rear body mount.

1929 Ford Hot Rod Roadster rear body modifications - additional 0.75 inch square tubing was welded just below the main frame created the strengthen the Brookville Roadster body. Now the new frame work is also supported by the body rails. This will add a considerable amount strength to the body and give me the last and most rear body mount.

New body frame work was created with a new body to frame mounting bracket welded in place. Now it came time to fit into the body. The new frame fits in between existing body support structure. Using the MIG welder everything was welded permanently in place. This took a bit of care as the 0.75 inch square tubing is thicker then the metal structure on the Brookville Roadster body. Once the welding was completed, everything was ground clean and smooth.

1929 Ford Hot Rod Roadster rear body modifications - now the new frame structure is completed and supported on three sides, the rear body modifications to the Brookville Roadster body is complete and ready for the custom C4 Corvette hot rod chassis.

1929 Ford Hot Rod Roadster rear body modifications - now the new frame structure is completed and supported on three sides, the rear body modifications to the Brookville Roadster body is complete and ready for the custom C4 Corvette hot rod chassis.

Additional 0.75 inch square tubing was welded along the body frame rail and the bottom side of the new frame. This would give me support on three sides and the addition strength in the body I was looking for.

This new structure will now be the mounting base for the trunk interior panels and speakers for the sound system. I also plan to use the space in between the rear chassis / frame rails as a storage compartment with a removal panel for access.

Share